Chocolate Industry

DEED Announces Film and TV Projects for Film Production Tax Credit

ST. PAUL — The Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED) has announced projects eligible for the Minnesota Film Production Tax Credit.

The tax credit program was enacted in 2021 to incentivize film and television productions to bring their business to Minnesota.

State incentives are one of the biggest contributing factors when deciding where to produce a project and Minnesota is one of 33 states that offer this incentive as an economic development tool.

The tax credit provides a 25% transferable income tax credit to production companies that spend at least $1,000,000 in a tax year on qualifying production costs, and generally most projects will spend more in the state than the amount that qualifies for the credit.

Approved projects include:

911 Renovation – TV Series
$1,208,493 in proposed expenses for Minnesota
Currently in production in the Twin Cities Subway
Cast: Stream on HGTV

Downtown Owl – Feature Film
$1,372,599 in proposed expenses for Minnesota
Principal photography in the Twin Cities subway is complete; Currently in post-production
Distributor: Sony Pictures

Merry KissCam – Feature Film
$2,115,919 in proposed spending for Minnesota
Production recently wrapped in Duluth
Distribution: major streaming service

Marmalade – Feature film
$1,999,797 in proposed expenses for Minnesota
Recently completed production in the Twin Cities and Stillwater Subway
Distribution: to be determined

Mattel Package – TV Commercials (multiple)
$1,781,700 proposed spending for Minnesota
Currently in production in Minneapolis
Description: MAKE has been awarded a batch of over 14 commercials for Mattel, to run in two halves of 2022. These include concept, production and post-production.

Family Dinner with Andrew Zimmern – TV Series
$1,774,860 in proposed spending for Minnesota
Currently in production
Distribution: Magnolia and Discovery+ networks

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